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Do A Pull-Up In 1 Month With This Back-Strengthening Plan

Do A Pull-Up In 1 Month With This Back-Strengthening Plan

how-to-pullup_870

Remi Pyrdol

The pull-up is one of those landmark physical feats that is a culmination of strength and all-around badassery. If a pull-up is on your fitness bucket list, here’s the one-month plan to help you reach that milestone. The best way to get comfortable with pull-ups is to do both the moves below and actual attempts,” says Ben Sweeney, coach at the CrossFit gym Brick New York and creator of this plan. “Even failed pull-ups have a payoff. They help develop the strength and mobility that you need. Work upward until you can get your chin over the bar.” Do this circuit below two times per week for a month and then it’s go time. 

You’ll Need: 8-pound dumbbells, plyo box, pull-up bar

Do: 3 sets, 2 times weekly

1. Hammer Curl

Stand with feet hip-width apart, a dumbbell in each hand, elbows bent 90 degrees, palms in. Curl dumbbells to shoulders. Lower for 1 rep. Do 10 reps.

2. Bent-Over Row

Stand in a gentle squat with feet hip-width apart, leaning forward, back straight, a dumbbell in each hand, palms down. Inhale, then exhale as you lift dumbbells to ribs, squeezing shoulder blades and keeping elbows close to body. Lower for 1 rep. Do 10 reps.

3. Negative Pull-Up

Stand on a plyo box, gripping a pull-up bar with palms out. Jump off box, bringing chin above bar, forearms close to body and core tight. Slowly lower, hanging from bar until arms are fully extended, for 1 rep. Do 10 reps.

4. Chin-Over-Bar Hold

Stand on a plyo box, gripping a pull-up bar with palms out. Jump off box, bringing chin above bar, forearms close to body and core tight. Hold 10 seconds, keeping core engaged, for 1 rep. Do 3 reps.

5. Back Fly

Stand with feet hip-width apart, a dumbbell in each hand, elbows bent 90 degrees. Keep back flat as you hinge forward slightly at hips. Lift arms out to side, keeping elbows bent and squeezing shoulder blades together. Lower for 1 rep. Do 10 reps.

6. Biceps Curl

Stand with feet hip-width apart, a dumbbell in each hand, palms forward. Bend elbows, bringing weights to shoulders. Return to start for 1 rep. Do 10 reps.

Ready to do a pull-up? Here are a few form tips to know:

Grip bar with hands just wider than shoulder-width apart, palms out. Draw shoulder blades together, engage core and pull yourself up, driving elbows toward ribs. Lift chin over bar; pause. Slowly lower for 1 rep.

This article originally appeared in the September 2016 issue of SELF. For more from the September issue, subscribe to SELF and download the digital edition. This full issue is available August 9 on national newsstands.

Styled by Taylor Okata; Hair, Dana Boyer for Bumble & Bumble; Makeup, Brit Cochran for DiorSkin; Manicure, Yuko Wada using Dior Vernis; Prop Styling, Anthony Asaro for UTOPIA NYC.

Sports bra, $50, and tights, $90; Nike.com.

You may also like: Try This 10-Minute Plyometric Workout You Can Do At Home

The post Do A Pull-Up In 1 Month With This Back-Strengthening Plan appeared first on SELF.


Source: Do A Pull-Up In 1 Month With This Back-Strengthening Plan

August 2, 20160 commentsRead More
Here’s Exactly How To Run Your Fastest Mile

Here’s Exactly How To Run Your Fastest Mile

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Getty Images

You can slash seconds off your best mile time without constantly pounding the pavement. “To quicken your pace you need to awaken your posterior chain,” says David Siik, creator of Equinox Precision Running in Los Angeles. That’s the group of muscles, tendons and ligaments on your backside—like the glutes and hamstrings—which many runners neglect. “A sleepy posterior chain puts undue stress on your joints,” he says. “It also diminishes the power on liftoff as you propel yourself forward.” Strengthening these muscles will increase power, maximize your stride efficiency and lower your risk for injury. Try combining the strength training moves below into a circuit, running half a track (200 meters) between each one. “This method will build the strength and endurance needed to absolutely crush your mile time,” Siik says.

Here’s the 30-day strength and speed plan Siik created to help you run your fastest mile yet. 

You’ll Need: Space to run

Do: 3 sets, 2 times weekly (plus regular runs)

1. Hopscotch Jump

Stand with feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. Imagine a 1-foot square in front of you. Quickly hop feet together to center of square, then spread feet as you hop back. Hop to center, then spread feet as you hop forward. Continue for 1 minute.

2. Fly Girl

Lie facedown with arms in front of you. Lift right arm and left leg at least 6 inches for 1 count. Lower, switch sides and repeat for 1 rep. Do 10 reps.

3. Single-Leg Glute Bridge

Lie faceup with feet flat, arms at sides. Lift hips and extend right leg to sky. Keep leg extended as you lower and lift hips for 1 rep. Do 12 reps. Switch sides; repeat.

4. Knee-Tuck Jump

Stand with feet slightly wider than hip-width apart. Squat, keeping knees over toes and arms at sides. Jump, bringing knees to chest and landing in a squat for 1 rep. Do 10 reps.

5. Push and Dash

Start in a high plank. Do 15 push-ups, then sprint 100 meters (about the length of a football field). Rest 30 seconds.

6. Bounding

Run normally, then exaggerate your stride, pushing up as well as forward. Continue for 100 meters.

This article originally appeared in the September 2016 issue of SELF. For more from the September issue, subscribe to SELF and download the digital edition. This full issue is available August 9 on national newsstands.

You may also like: Try This 10-Minute Plyometric Workout You Can Do At Home

The post Here’s Exactly How To Run Your Fastest Mile appeared first on SELF.


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6 Moves That Will Help You Nail A Headstand

6 Moves That Will Help You Nail A Headstand

how-to-headstand_870

Remi Pyrdol 

To do a headstand you’ll need to build core, back, and shoulder strength. Nina Marchione, creator of the Sculpt and BarreBreak classes at Solace in New York City, created a 30-day plan that will help get you there.

You’ll Need: 10-pound dumbbells, yoga mat

Do: 3 sets, 3 times weekly

1. Overhead Press

Stand with feet shoulder-width apart, holding dumbbells at shoulder height, palms forward. Press weights overhead until biceps are at ears. Slowly return to start for 1 rep. Do 15 reps.

2. Leaning Toe Tap

Start with hands and knees on a yoga mat. Bend elbows 90 degrees as you lower head between hands. Extend legs back, balancing on toes. Lift right leg, then lower, tapping toes to ground, 25 times. Switch sides; repeat.

3. Downward Dog Push-Up

Start in a Downward Dog on a yoga mat. Lower chest to ground, keeping elbows close to ribs. Push through palms back to start for 1 rep. Do 10 reps.

4. Boat Pose

Sit on a yoga mat, knees bent. Lift feet off ground, balancing on butt. Keep spine long as you straighten legs without rounding back, arms straight, palms up. Hold 30 seconds.

5. Plank to Downward Dog

Start in a high plank. Push through palms and lift hips into a Downward Dog. Return to start for 1 rep. Do 10 reps.

6. Wide-Leg Forward Bend

Stand with feet wider than hip-width apart, toes slightly in, fingers interlaced behind you. Keep legs and back straight as you fold forward at hips. Hold 30 seconds, reaching hands to ground and torso between legs.

When you’re ready to try the headstand, here’s how to do it:

“When you set up for a headstand, think of yourself as a triangle,” Marchione says. “Your head is the top; your hands or elbows are the bottom two corners. Keep your body weight distributed to all three points to protect your head and neck and maintain your form.” Start with hands and knees on a yoga mat. Lower head and forearms to mat, shoulders over elbows. Clasp hands at top of head. Push into forearms, lifting shoulders, and pushing head down. Balance on balls of feet, then engage core as you then slowly kick right leg up, followed by left. Hold 30 seconds. 

This article originally appeared in the September 2016 issue of SELF. For more from the September issue, subscribe to SELF and download the digital edition. This full issue is available August 9 on national newsstands.

Styled by Taylor Okata; Hair, Dana Boyer for Bumble & Bumble; Makeup, Brit Cochran for DiorSkin; Manicure, Yuko Wada using Dior Vernis; Prop Styling, Anthony Asaro for UTOPIA NYC.

Sports bra, $60, tights, $95, and sneakers, $130; Nike.com.

You may also like: Try This 10-Minute Plyometric Workout You Can Do At Home

The post 6 Moves That Will Help You Nail A Headstand appeared first on SELF.


Source: 6 Moves That Will Help You Nail A Headstand

Perfect Your Push-Up Form: 30 Days To Upper-Body Strength

Perfect Your Push-Up Form: 30 Days To Upper-Body Strength

how-to-pushup_feat

Remi Pyrdol 

Lowering your bodyweight all the way to the ground—and back—is the epitome of full-body strength. It isn’t easy, but it’s an insanely effective move, and that’s why it’s so important to master. This 30-day plan will help you build that upper-body badassery and it will strengthen all of the muscles groups required to execute the push-up with perfect form. Put on your game face (and your sports bra) because it’s go time!

Your Coach: Adrienne Felder, Lululemon ambassador and owner of Architect Studios in New Jersey

You’ll Need: 10-pound dumbbells

Do: 3 sets of the circuit below, 3 times a week for four weeks

1. Progressive Plank

Start in a forearm plank. Straighten right arm, shifting weight onto right hand. Repeat with left arm, coming to a high plank. Return to start without bending knees. Repeat, starting with left arm; continue for 1 minute.

2. Overhead Crunch

Lie faceup with legs together, holding dumbbells with arms overhead on ground. Contract abs and lift shoulder blades as you reach arms and legs to sky. Lower for 1 rep. Do 10 reps.

3. Chest Press

Lie faceup, feet flat, holding dumbbells up with arms out to sides, elbows bent 90 degrees. Push dumbbells over chest until they touch. Slowly lower for 1 rep. Do 10 reps.

4. Kneeling Overhead Triceps Extension

Kneel, holding a dumbbell overhead with both hands, arms extended. Bend elbows to lower dumbbell behind you, keeping biceps close to ears, then return to start for 1 rep. Do 10 reps.

5. Dumbbell Deadlift

Stand with feet hip-width apart, knees slightly bent, holding dumbbells in front of thighs, palms down. Bend forward at hips, lowering torso until nearly parallel to ground, keeping weights close to body. Return to start for 1 rep. Do 10 reps.

6. Side Plank

Start in a low plank. Lift one arm as you rotate into a side plank with ankles stacked and hips lifted. Hold 1 minute. Repeat twice.

This article originally appeared in the September 2016 issue of SELF. For more from the September issue, subscribe to SELF and download the digital edition. This full issue is available August 9 on national newsstands.

Styled by Taylor Okata; Hair, Dana Boyer for Bumble & Bumble; Makeup, Brit Cochran for DiorSkin; Manicure, Yuko Wada using Dior Vernis; Prop Styling, Anthony Asaro for UTOPIA NYC.

Sports bra, $60, tights, $140, and sneakers, $130; Nike.com.

You may also like: Try This 10-Minute Plyometric Workout You Can Do At Home

The post Perfect Your Push-Up Form: 30 Days To Upper-Body Strength appeared first on SELF.


Source: Perfect Your Push-Up Form: 30 Days To Upper-Body Strength

Here’s What You Need To Know About Feeling Nauseated After Your Workout

Here’s What You Need To Know About Feeling Nauseated After Your Workout

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In this age of tough bootcamp workouts and high-intensity interval training, feeling like you want to hurl has become an increasingly common aspect of a serious sweat session. If you ever (or often) find yourself dealing with queasiness as the result of a challenging workout, know this: You’re not alone; exercise-induced nausea is a real thing—and it can really get in the way of the post-sweat pride you should be feeling. 

There are a few reasons for that puke-y feeling towards the end of or after a difficult workout. Here’s what you need to know about feeling sick (or even vomiting) after you sweat—and how to know if you might need to back off a bit for your body’s sake.

When you get your blood pumping during a hard workout, your digestive tract gets the short shrift. 

“Because of the intensity [of a hard workout] and the significant workload, blood is distributed to the muscles to promote nutrient and oxygen transport. Unfortunately, this leaves little blood left to circulate to the stomach and intestines, and as a result oftentimes triggers a nausea or vomiting response,” exercise physiologist Dr. Joel Seedman, Ph.D., an athletic performance specialist and owner of Advanced Human Performance in Atlanta, Georgia, tells SELF.

Basically, your gastrointestinal system isn’t getting adequate support when your body is moving blood to where it’s needed most. Some workouts are worse than others when it comes to commanding tons of blood flow—for example, leg day can leave you more prone to nausea. “This is due to the size of the muscles as well as the overall volume of work that the legs are capable of handling.”

“In addition, intense full-body workouts can further exaggerate this response, as every muscle in the body will be competing for blood flow,” he says. To counteract this affect, Seedman suggests balancing out a full-body workout by only focusing on intensity for one area. If you’re doing a crazy-hard upper-body workout, take it easy on your lower body that day.

Working out at a higher intensity than you’re used to can make you feel ill. 

While it’s great to challenge yourself in the gym, if you choose a workout that you’re not conditioned enough for, you could be setting yourself up for sickness. This is because your body isn’t able to handle the metabolite accumulation that happens when you push extra hard.

Seedman explains, “The harder your muscles work, the more oxygen they need, but after certain point your body is unable to match the oxygen demand with the intensity of the exercise, so you begin to build up metabolic wastes in your body such as hydrogen ions, carbon dioxide, and lactic acid.” This is also what causes that burning feeling in your muscles during a workout. “This buildup can also create a toxic environment and increase the acidity of your body, which can cause an individual to experience a temporary state of nausea and sickness,” he says.

You can experience this no matter what your fitness level is, but you’re more likely to be affected when your body isn’t used to the work you’re putting it through. If you find yourself feeling nauseated after a workout often, try scaling back your workout intensity. Consistently feeling nauseous after a workout can be a sign that you’re overdoing it. “Even for metabolic conditioning purposes, the goal is to provide an intense stimulus without destroying the body in the process,” says Seedman. You can also take longer rest periods in between exercises. 

The good news, though? Once the exercise is complete, these metabolites start to clear out of your body, so that sick feeling fades away. 

The post Here’s What You Need To Know About Feeling Nauseated After Your Workout appeared first on SELF.


Source: Here’s What You Need To Know About Feeling Nauseated After Your Workout

August 1, 20160 commentsRead More