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Archive for January, 2016

This Challenging Plank Alternative Works Your Abs—And Adds Cardio, Too

This Challenging Plank Alternative Works Your Abs—And Adds Cardio, Too

Try this plank alternative from POPSUGAR Fitness for cardio and strength training in one.

Torch calories while toning your abs and arms with the bunny hop. Yeah, the name sounds cute, but this exercise is killer. We love adding a bit of cardio to the basic plank, and we also love how this move makes our abs and arms burn in the best way possible.

Bunny Hop

POPSUGAR Photography

  • Begin in a plank position with the feet together.
  • Pull your abs in, and jump your feet to the right, bringing your knees toward your right elbow. Your torso will twist to the right.
  • Jump your feet back to plank to complete one rep.
  • Repeat on the other side, and continue alternating sides for 20 reps total.

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The post This Challenging Plank Alternative Works Your Abs—And Adds Cardio, Too appeared first on SELF.


Source: This Challenging Plank Alternative Works Your Abs—And Adds Cardio, Too

January 31, 20160 commentsRead More
5 Brilliant Tips For Starting A Home Yoga Practice

5 Brilliant Tips For Starting A Home Yoga Practice

It’s easy to start—and stick—to a home yoga practice with these tips from Well + Good.

At-home yoga seems like it should be as easy as rolling out your mat and easing into downward dog. But even for a veteran like Linda Sparrowe—former Yoga International editor-in-chief, frequent Yoga Journal contributor, and author of six yoga books—finding your flow outside of class can sometimes be a bit, well, confusing.

“To be completely truthful, for years home practice was a challenge for me, even as a longtime practitioner and teacher,” admits Sparrowe. “How can I possibly practice if I don’t have my own yoga room…if I can’t commit to 90 minutes or an hour…if I can’t figure out what to practice?”

For her latest book, Yoga at Home: Inspiration for Creating Your Own Home Practice, Sparrowe sought to answer those questions by profiling the at-home routines of renowned yogis like Seane Corn, Rodney Yee, and Elena Brower.

It’s part yoga guide, and part yoga voyeurism, since in a lot of cases you’re looking into their living rooms.

“[Photographer Sarah Keough and I] were interested in showing how people really live and all the different ways they find moments of stillness and times for practice within their great and messy and beautiful lives,” Sparrowe says.

What did she find? “The intention you set and the awareness you bring to your actions are what make yoga personal. Home practice is as much about ritual as it is about content,” she says.

To inspire your own home routine, Sparrowe takes us inside the homes of five top yogis for their tips. Roll out your mat and let the vinyasa flow. —Larkin Clark for Well+Good

1. Don’t skimp on savasana.

Yogi Rodney Yee

(Photo: ©Sarah Keough)

Rodney Yee, yoga teacher, studio owner, and co-direcor of Urban Zen Foundation

Home practice, oddly enough, is particularly difficult for advanced practitioners, because they are so used to doing a strong, vinyasa-style practice, Yee says. He encourages them to slow down and add at least a 15-minute savasana (resting pose) to the end of their practice. (Normally it’s about 3 to 5 minutes in class.) “Sometimes you have to sit still long enough for something genuine to arise and then have the courage to follow that arising voice,” says Yee. “And it’s not the same every day. It’s a listening game. After the listening, true activity unfolds in a natural and harmonious way.”

The post 5 Brilliant Tips For Starting A Home Yoga Practice appeared first on SELF.


Source: 5 Brilliant Tips For Starting A Home Yoga Practice

January 30, 20160 commentsRead More
8 Easy Ways to Kick-Start Your Metabolism

8 Easy Ways to Kick-Start Your Metabolism

Trying to burn more calories? These simple diet and workout tricks will get your metabolism moving in no time.
Source: 8 Easy Ways to Kick-Start Your Metabolism

January 29, 20160 commentsRead More
Common Dieting Mistakes, Solved

Common Dieting Mistakes, Solved

“I eat mostly veggies and I still haven’t lost any weight!” the woman wailed. A mom of three, she was in my office on her first ever visit to a dietitian, 20 pounds overweight—and unknowingly derailing herself with her limited diet. Time and again, I see both classic and modern-day eating mistakes that have a huge impact on weight, health, and quality of life. These are the top blunders and the simple solutions I tell clients that will help you, too.

Assuming ‘good’ calories don’t count
I constantly see women overdoing it on whole grains because they’re good for them. They are so important for your health, but large portions cause weight gain, period. The other day at a Mexican restaurant, I noticed women ordering gigantic bowls of brown rice with beans and chicken and cheese and guacamole, and it took every inch of willpower not to tell them, “Those foods are all good for you, but together they’re way more calories than your body needs at one meal!” The truth is, unless you burn off as many calories as you take in, you’ll put on pounds. Even fruit and veggies (gasp!) get converted to fat.

RD Rx: Know what your daily portions should be. Here’s a plan for a 5-foot-4, 150-pound woman who walks 30 minutes two to three days a week:
4 servings of veggies (1 serving = 1 cup) 4 servings of whole grains (1 serving = a slice of whole-grain bread or a half cup of brown rice) 4 servings of lean protein (1 serving = 3 ounces of meat or a half cup of beans) 4 servings of healthy fat (1 serving = 1 tablespoon of oil or a quarter of an avocado) Ditching a food group (or three)
I’m seeing more women on vegan and gluten-free diets, not for ethical or health reasons but to shed pounds. Thing is, if you don’t replace those lost carbs, protein, and fat—a.k.a. macronutrients—it can lead to weight gain, fatigue, irritability, and digestive issues. You need the Goldilocks approach to macronutrients: not too little, not too much.

RD Rx: Complement a veggie-centric meal with a half-cup of beans, or a couple tablespoons of nuts; get in healthy carbs with gluten-free quinoa or brown rice. You’ll see a difference! One vegan client used to eat just raw veggies, oil, and vinegar for dinner. Once she switched to a few cups of roasted veggies with wild rice, herbed lentils, and a few tablespoons of walnuts—adding carbs and protein—she broke her weight-loss plateau (thanks, newly revved metabolism) and vanquished her chronic bloating and fatigue.

Not eating often enough
It may be tempting to “save up” calories for dinner out or the weekend, but that can sap energy, mess with your mood, and force your body to burn muscle for fuel—which slows your metabolism. One study found that when people ate just one large meal late in the day, they upped their risk of prediabetes. I once had a client who stopped losing weight because she moved her afternoon snack to the evening—which meant a seven-hour stretch of no food between lunch and dinner and two rounds of eating at night, when her activity was low.

RD Rx: It’s simple: Eat every three to five hours. Once my client moved her snack back to 4 p.m., the scale dial budged again.

Eating your feelings
One woman I work with regularly overate. She had a high-pressure job and a demanding family, and she was a perfectionist with a spotless home. I’ll never forget the stunned look on her face when I asked how she felt while overeating. “It feels like reckless abandon, like a moment of freedom,” she said. Ta-da!

RD Rx: Keep a log of what you eat, how much, and your feelings before and after. It’s an eye-opener; one client saw that she craved crunchy or chewy foods when she was mad at her boss or husband. The trick is to replace eating with other coping mechanisms. The perfectionist started going salsa dancing; the thrill of polishing off a pizza dwindled, and she shrank two sizes in three months.

Doing a quick fix
Every woman I’ve counseled has tried a fad diet. A drastic low-cal plan sends your body into conservation mode, so you burn calories slower. It can also cause headaches, moodiness, fatigue, cravings, and, of course, only temporary weight loss.

RD Rx: Jot this on a sticky note for your fridge: NO fad diet is good for my health or happiness. Then avoid them like the plague.


Source: Common Dieting Mistakes, Solved

The Fastest Exercise to Lift Your Butt

The Fastest Exercise to Lift Your Butt

Lift and tone your rear fast with this move, which activates your abs, hamstrings, and glutes and fires up your muscles. Watch this video to see a flyBarre instructor demonstrate your favorite—fast!—new exercise.
Source: The Fastest Exercise to Lift Your Butt

Your New Cardio Playlist Was Curated By This Fitness-Loving DJ

Your New Cardio Playlist Was Curated By This Fitness-Loving DJ

This article originally appeared in the January/February 2016 issue of SELF.

Hannah Bronfman’s secret for getting stronger and fitter is easy to adapt: Do plyometric exercises to tunes with an infectious beat.

“I love explosive moves because you can get an amazing burn in less time,” says Bronfman, deejay and wellness entrepreneur. “And music puts me in a meditative state, so I’m not focused on how hard an interval is.”

Bronfman shares one of her favorite fitness playlists below; it’s good for working out and getting ready to go out to. Cue it up to power through a tough workout—or anytime you want to make this new year even more awesome.

Related: The Only Two Moves You Need To Get An Incredible Workout

Hannah Bronfman’s Workout Playlist

We’re All Friends
Jay Xero

Emergency
Icona Pop

To U (Oliver Remix)
Skrillex and Diplo

Sorry
Justin Bieber

Big Rings
Drake and Future

On My Mind
Ellie Goulding

I Really Like You (Giraffage Remix)
Carly Rae Jepsen

In the Night
The Weeknd

Cake by the Ocean
DNCE

This Could Be Us
Rae Sremmurd

*Not every track was available on Spotify.

Related: 11 Easy Ways To Eat Healthy When Youre Busy As Hell

The post Your New Cardio Playlist Was Curated By This Fitness-Loving DJ appeared first on SELF.


Source: Your New Cardio Playlist Was Curated By This Fitness-Loving DJ

10-Minute Moves For Strength, Speed and Agility

10-Minute Moves For Strength, Speed and Agility

Source: 10-Minute Moves For Strength, Speed and Agility

January 28, 20160 commentsRead More
5 Ways to Treat Injuries and Speed Recovery

5 Ways to Treat Injuries and Speed Recovery

How to ease your aches and pains at home.
Source: 5 Ways to Treat Injuries and Speed Recovery

15 Running Tips You Need to Know

15 Running Tips You Need to Know

Want to get faster and fitter as you rack up the miles? Follow this all-star advice.
Source: 15 Running Tips You Need to Know

How to Buy the Best Running Shoes

How to Buy the Best Running Shoes

Looking for a new pair of running shoes? We can help. In this video, learn the key things you need to look for when shopping for sneakers, so you can avoid injury and be the best runner you can be.
Source: How to Buy the Best Running Shoes