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The Weird Reason Why Stress Sweat Might Smell Worse Than Exercise Sweat

The Weird Reason Why Stress Sweat Might Smell Worse Than Exercise Sweat

Some people do notice they give off an extra-foul stench when they’re feeling overwhelmed or anxious. A little background info: The purpose of sweating is to regulate body temperature; with stress sweat, a shift in hormones, such as adrenaline, causes the body to have a fightor-flight response that leads to excessive sweating. But there are two main types of sweat glands, and they produce different types of sweat. When you exercise, you produce sweat, consisting mainly of water and salt, from eccrine glands all around the body that open on the surface of the skin in order to cool you down. When you’re stressed out, sweat gets produced by apocrine glands, which are located in spots on the body that have lots of hair follicles. While all sweat is odorless, the perspiration produced in the areas where we have hair follicles, such as the armpits and the groin, smells bad when it leaves the follicles and combines with bacteria on the skin’s surface. This sweat also contains fats and proteins, which the bacteria likes to feed on.


RELATED: The Best Clinical Strength Deodorants for Your Sweatiest Workouts


So, controlling stress in general will keep body odor at bay in high-anxiety moments. Have stress management techniques—some deep breathing, a quick meditation in a quiet room at the office, you know the drill—in place that you can use, say, before a big presentation. And avoid overdoing it on caffeine during stress spirals; it can cause blood pressure and heart rate to rise and can make stress symptoms even worse.


Also, if you’re worried about stress sweat ruining a moment, try a clinical strength antiperspirant-deodorant (tons of options are available at the drugstore; we like Secret Clinical Strength) at night, when your armpits are drier and the pores will take in the product better—and reapply in the morning.


 


Health’s medical editor, Roshini Rajapaksa, MD, is assistant professor of medicine at the NYU School of Medicine.


Source: The Weird Reason Why Stress Sweat Might Smell Worse Than Exercise Sweat

February 23, 20180 commentsRead More
What to Do If Working Out Is Killing Your Knees

What to Do If Working Out Is Killing Your Knees

Knee pain is a common exercise complaint. The knee is an intricate joint, involving bones, menisci, muscles, tendons, and ligaments all supporting the joint. If there is damage or stress to any of these components, you may have achy knees. Plus, many physical activities—running, jumping, stretching, bending—can put a lot of strain, impact, or body weight directly on the knees, and in turn, cause pain while you work out. This is common among weekend warriors who work out intensely but inconsistently. You can also develop tendonitis over time if you’re regularly doing these motions.


Some causes of knee pain are a bit more serious, however. A common cause in young people, especially those who exercise or play high-impact sports, is patellofemoral pain syndrome. Also known as runner’s knee, this syndrome is characterized by pain in the soft tissues and bone around the kneecap. Treatment may involve rest and physical therapy to stabilize the knee joint. Or, it’s possible that the cartilage in your knees has suffered some wear and tear with use and age (osteoarthritis), in which case you may have to change up your workouts and incorporate more low-impact activities, like swimming, using the elliptical, or cycling, to lessen the pain.


Doing away with general knee pain from exercising could just be a matter of perfecting your form when you, say, run or do squats and lunges. A few sessions with a certified personal trainer or physical therapist can help you learn these basic movements so that you’re doing them with correct form every time and not putting yourself at risk of injury or long-term damage. Or you may need to do physical therapy to improve your knee stabilization. But because there are so many possible reasons for knee pain, your best bet is to talk to your doctor so you can get the specific help you need.


 


Health’s medical editor, Roshini Rajapaksa, MD, is assistant professor of medicine at the NYU School of Medicine.


Source: What to Do If Working Out Is Killing Your Knees

5 Ways to Torch Your Core in Every Workout

5 Ways to Torch Your Core in Every Workout

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This article originally appeared on DailyBurn.com. Check out the rest of the exercises at Daily Burn.


At the core of every movement is just that: your core. And while lots of times “core” and “abs” become synonymous, it’s not 100% correct to use them interchangeably. Your rectus abdominus, transverse abdominus and obliques do comprise your midsection, but those aren’t the only muscles involved. Your back, hips and glutes also provide that stable base you need for stepping forward and backward, jumping side-to-side or turning all about. So to get a serious core workout you need to work them all.


“Core strength and stability not only enhances physical and athletic performance, but also helps maintain and correct posture and form, and prevent injury,” says Andia Winslow, a Daily Burn Audio Workouts trainer. “Those who have an awareness of their core and ability to engage it properly also have enhanced proprioception — or a sense of the positions of their extremities, without actually seeing them.”


Just picture elite athlete’s movement, Winslow explains, and how rhythmic and easy they travel through space, often in several planes of motion at the same time. They can thank strong trunk muscles for that. “Core should be a focus in every workout,” Winslow says. “Workouts won’t be as effective without proper core engagement.”


That’s not to say crunches need a permanent place in your sweat sessions. You can easily sneak in added core challenges during other common exercises. “When folks elect to add difficulty to workouts, they often increase weight, repetition or duration. Another — and often more effective — way to increase the intensity is by altering stance, ground contact, and/or dynamic variance equipment [think: sand or water],” Winslow says. Shifting your weight, testing your balance, or focusing on sticking a landing, all engage your middle more.


Learn how to get a solid core workout in every strength session with these sneaky midsection-scorching strategies from Winslow.


RELATED: 50 Ab Exercises to Score a Stronger Core


Strength Tips: How to Work Your Core in Every Workout



Photo: Twenty20


1. Add weight overhead. 


Whether you’re doing squats or lunges, Winslow suggests pushing or holding a weight overhead — or even just keeping your arms straight up — to activate your abs and shoulders. These muscle groups have to work harder to keep your spine in a neutral position so you don’t over-arch, straining your low back. Translation: Put your hands in the air like you really care (about your core workout).


2. Hold your step-ups and pull-ups.


Stepping up onto a bench, chair or box requires you to use one leg, driving off your heel to reach the top. While balancing on one limb already works your core to keep you upright, Winslow explains that pausing at the top (with knee raised) will incorporate your midsection more. When you stand up, simply hold for a two- to five-second count, then go back down.


Same strategy holds (literally!) for chin-ups and pull-ups. By pausing with your chin at the bar, your core fires to keep you steady and in one solid line. Leg or arm day turned core workout.


RELATED: 6 Exercises for the Ultimate Back and Chest Workout



Photo: Twenty20


3. Stick a single-leg landing on box jumps.


To crank up the core work in a box jump, start by bringing the hop height down. Then, keep the explosive leap to one leg and really stick the landing. (Hold it at the top for one to three seconds before standing up and stepping off.) One full-body exercise at its finest.


4. Do a single-arm dumbbell press or fly.


Make your arm and ab routine go hand-in-hand. Moving one arm at a time in exercises like a dumbbell press or fly, drives your midsection to work against the rotation to keep your hips square and your back straight. This will work whether you’re standing or lying on your back. Lift your hips into a bridge and you target your glutes, too. So many muscles; so much less time.


RELATED: 5 Planks, 10 Minutes: Your Ultimate Abs Workout



Photo: Daily Burn 365


5. Go for a twist. 


We tend to rotate in multiple directions all day, from turning to give a fellow studio mate a high five to twisting around to chat with a co-worker. But to keep that movement safe, your core needs enough strength to prop you upright and protect the spine. Enter: rotational exercises to build stability. Try twisting your torso at the top of a step-up or the bottom of a front or side lunge, so your body learns to better handle those turns you take throughout the day.


Source: 5 Ways to Torch Your Core in Every Workout

February 22, 20180 commentsRead More
Even Light Exercise Can Help You Live Longer

Even Light Exercise Can Help You Live Longer

A new study shows that small bouts of light physical activity are enough to increase lifespan in older men.


Government guidelines recommended that adults get at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise every week. However, only about half of American adults actually meet those recommendations, and for older adults, they may seem hard to achieve. But a new report published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine suggests that there’s a way to tweak guidelines to make them more feasible for older people, while still maintaining health.


In the report, researchers looked at about 1,180 men — average age, 78 — who agreed to wear devices that measured their movements for seven days. They were followed for about five years. The researchers found that the overall volume of exercise, not necessarily how long or how hard someone exercised in a session, mattered most for longevity.


The men in the study didn’t even need to exercise for long periods of time to experience positive results. Sporadic bouts of exercise throughout the day, even if each bout was under 10 minutes, had similar benefits to lifespan as exercising more than 10 minutes at a time. This method seemed to fit into men’s lives, too; 66% of the men in the study were able to meet their weekly recommended exercise if they did it in shorter bursts.


MORE: The Surprising Secrets to Living Longer — And Better


Every 30 minutes of light intensity activity per day — like going on a walk or gardening — was linked to a 17% lower risk of early death in the study. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity had an even stronger link to a longer life: doing it was associated with a 33% reduction in death risk for every 30 minutes of exercise. However, the fact that light exercise still appeared to have a notable longevity benefit is important, the study authors write.


If more research is able to confirm the findings, it could suggest that getting just a few minutes of exercise at a time — even if it’s light — can lower the risk of early death in men. The researchers conclude that their findings “could refine physical activity guidelines and make them more achievable for older adults with low activity levels: stressing the benefits of all activities, however modest, from light intensity upwards,” as well as encouraging people to do any level of physical activity throughout the day.


Source: Even Light Exercise Can Help You Live Longer

February 21, 20180 commentsRead More
The Upper Body Exercise Alicia Vikander Does for Amazing Arms

The Upper Body Exercise Alicia Vikander Does for Amazing Arms

When Alicia Vikander, 29, steps into the role of Lara Croft in Tomb Raider (in theaters March 16), her upper body strength will be on display. And this circuit was key, says her trainer, Magnus Lygdbäck. “It was crucial to Alicia’s aesthetics, helping her shape her arms, and it gave her the strength needed to wield weapons and climb.”




Alternating Bicep Curl + Double Biceps Curl


Stand with feet hipwidth apart and arms at sides, a dumbbell in each hand (A). Bend right elbow, and curl weight to shoulder (B). Lower to start. Repeat on left. Do 8 reps per side. Follow with double curls, cutting weight in half. Do 10 reps. Repeat circuit 4 times.


Dumbbell French Press


Lie faceup on a bench with knees bent and feet flat. Holding a dumbbell in each hand, straighten arms directly over chest, with palms facing in (A). Bend elbows, and slowly lower dumbbells toward shoulders (B). Pause, and then press weights back up to start. Do 4 sets of 15 reps.


Cable Rope Triceps Extension + Cable Curl


Hold a cable rope with your back to machine, a hinge in hips, elbows bent, and hands behind head (A). Extend arms out (B). Return to start; do 15 reps. Follow with curls. Facing machine, with hands at thighs, grip bar (A). Curl up (B). Lower down; do 15 reps. Repeat cycle 4 times.


Source: The Upper Body Exercise Alicia Vikander Does for Amazing Arms

This Woman Was Paralyzed After Doing Sit-Ups

This Woman Was Paralyzed After Doing Sit-Ups

Sit-ups are such a standard strength-training exercise, you never think you could be seriously injured doing one. But that’s what happened to a 23-year-old Brazilian law graduate and fitness model—and her recovery has been nothing short of miraculous.


In January 2016, Marcelle Mancuso was at the gym doing inverted sit-ups (which means your ankles are in the air high and your head lower near the floor) while strapped into a bench. A trainer who was spotting her also held her feet as she did her sit-ups.


“The band that held my feet broke and I hit my head on the floor, breaking the cervical spine and immediately became tetraplegic,” she tells Health. “I lost all movement from the neck down.”


RELATED: The Flat-Belly Workouts Celebrities Swear By for Sexy, Sculpted Abs


Also referred to as quadriplegia, tetraplegia is the paralysis of both the upper and lower parts of the body—including the fingers, hands, arms, chest, legs, feet, and toes. Tetraplegia can also limit mobility of the head, neck, and shoulders, states the University of Alabama School of Medicine. 


After the injury, which left her without the use of her arms and legs, Mancuso says that doctors put a titanium plate and six screws in her neck to realign her spine.


“The doctors did not know if I would walk again,” she says. “I was scared but I fought. I have been resilient and dedicated myself every day to my physiotherapy.”




 




 




Mancuso had to learn how to walk and even feed herself all over again, but she eventually managed to recover and return to the gym. Today, she says she leads a “normal and independent life,” and can walk, run, jump rope, and swim.


“I thank God every day for that,” she says of her miraculous recovery. As for her sit-up routine, she tells us that she’s done with the inverted kind. “I do sit-ups but only on the ground, lying flat!” she says.


Source: This Woman Was Paralyzed After Doing Sit-Ups

Kourtney Kardashian Reveals She Weighs 98 Lbs.—Just 36 More Than 8-Year-Old Son Mason

Kourtney Kardashian Reveals She Weighs 98 Lbs.—Just 36 More Than 8-Year-Old Son Mason

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It won’t be long before Kourtney Kardashian‘s 8-year-old son Mason will be able to lift her up.


In a deleted scene from Sunday’s episode of Keeping Up with the Kardashiansthe eldest of the KarJenner siblings is hanging out in sister Khloé Kardashian‘s kitchen. After Kourtney mixes up a salad and talks about going for a run in the heat, Khloé tells friend Simon Gebrelul, “You know she’s 97 lbs.?”


“Guess what? I gained a pound,” Kourtney corrects her. “I’m 98 [lbs].”


She adds, “You know Mason is 62 [lbs.]?”


RELATED: Kim Kardashian West Says Her Waist Is Now 24 Inches — ‘It’s Never Been 24, Ever In My Life’



The pint-sized star, 38, has never shied away from sharing the number on the scale with her fans. After giving birth to her third child with Scott Disickson Reign, in December 2014, she documented herself getting back into pre-baby shape.


In one Instagram photo posted in April 2015, Kourtney revealed she weighed in at a svelte 116 lbs. — and shut down her haters in the caption.


“I’m 5 feet tall, so everyone relax,” she wrote. “I’m on a workout kick, trying to bring some Monday motivation.”



The reality star is no stranger to tough workouts, even making time to squeeze in a sweat session on vacation — and sticks to a strict organic diet, meaning sugar is out.


“I always try to avoid sugar — especially refined sugar — for so many reasons,” she shared on her website and app last year. “First, sugar is addictive and I notice that after I eat it, I need it. Sugar doesn’t sustain you when you actually need energy, like for a workout. Also, when I eat sugar, I find that more cellulite appears.”


The mom of three also revealed that she doesn’t drink soda and makes her own salad dressings at home. She’s also careful about what alcohol she drinks, sticking to tequila on the rocks, beer or wine.



On top of keeping her body in check, Kourtney finds keeping a clean diet is best for her and her kids’ overall health.


“I have always felt fine before when eating dairy and gluten, but I do believe that we have one life to live and I would like to live it feeling my best,” she said in 2016. “I have noticed a great positive change in behavior with my children when we stick to a gluten-free and dairy-free diet.”


“I don’t think everyone needs to eat this way,” she added. “But we had muscle testing done, which showed we all have sensitivities to corn, gluten and dairy.”


Source: Kourtney Kardashian Reveals She Weighs 98 Lbs.—Just 36 More Than 8-Year-Old Son Mason

February 20, 20180 commentsRead More
U.S. Skater Couple Competed Through a 'Kind of Traumatic' Moment Just Before Taking the Ice

U.S. Skater Couple Competed Through a 'Kind of Traumatic' Moment Just Before Taking the Ice

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American ice dancers Evan Bates and Madison Chock skated to a season’s best on Monday (Sunday night stateside) in their first routine at the 2018 Winter Olympics, ending in seventh place to advance to the event’s second half on Tuesday.


It was, all things considered, an energetic performance to be proud of, Bates later told reporters — in addition to everything else because Chock has for months been dealing with a foot injury that flared up again during their warmup, minutes before they took the ice.


“We just had a weird moment” when Bates was lifting Chock, she said afterward. “It was the exact same thing that we did that originally injured my foot, and so that was just kind of traumatic.”


“I think considering everything, considering the stumble in the warmup and the pain that Maddie’s competed in, it’s incredible,” Bates, 28, said of their 75.45 result, which trailed American teammates Zach Donohue and Madison Hubbell and Alex and Maia Shibutani.


“We’ll definitely take that performance and that score and look for a special performance tomorrow,” he said.


Her injury, Chock, 25, explained to a group of reporters following their short dance, is an “osteochondral lesion in my foot.”


Basically: “There’s a loose bone fragment that’s in the joint that just is being held in by the cartilage right now,” she said. “And so when that happens [the moment in the warmup], it kind of just jostles it more and it just doesn’t feel very good.”


“But I’ve been dealing with it all season so it’s really no different,” she said. “I’m going to continue doing what I’m doing, just maybe a little extra ice and PT today.”






Chock, who has reportedly been dating Bates for about two years, stressed that the discussion of her foot injury — which had been largely kept private — was not and would not become their focus. But she conceded to reporters that she was in pain after competing on Monday.


“This is bad to say, but I guess I’m used to it at this point,” she tells PEOPLE after being asked how much pain she felt while in the rink.


“Really before it happened, like, I’ve been feeling pretty good, haven’t been hurting,” Chock says. “But I have a feeling it’ll be very sore a little bit later today.”


As Bates recalled, Chock first was hurt last summer “right before” a training camp.


“We did exactly the same movement [that they later did at the Olympic warmup] and Maddie suffered the injury,” he said. “And at the time we weren’t even sure if we were going to be able to do the Grand Prixs,” referring to an international series of competitions.


But Chock “taped it up every day, she’s gotten cortisone shots and she’s been really quiet about it and just been so tough and so resilient and skating so well,” Bates said. “And then we literally did it [the move that caused the injury] with 10 seconds left on the five-minute warmup at the Olympics, and it’s just one of those things you can’t even write or imagine.”


Even so, backstage before they competed, “I just knew Maddie was going to skate well, and she did, and that’s just a testament to her character,” Bates said.


He did not know during their short dance that Chock was hurting — something she effectively concealed both from the cameras and the audience.




“We didn’t want anything to take away from our programs this season,” Chock told reporters of why they have previously not discussed her injury.


“It’s an Olympic year, we didn’t want that to be a focus,” she said. “We knew it would probably surface eventually, as it has, but it definitely isn’t the focus. I mean, still, it won’t be the focus because I’ve been dealing with it all season and nothing will change. We’ll still skate a good free program and be ready to go. [I have] a great team around me and a great support system right next to me, so it’ll be fine.”


Bates and Chock certainly had other things to discuss, including a color-streaked feathered costume she wore that she said was inspired by the red and blue macaw. “It’s such a lively theme [in the ice dancing event] and we really wanted to embody that in the way we felt and in our costumes,” she said.


Yes, Chock said, she was in a “little bit” of pain after competing, while speaking with the press. “But it’s okay,” she said. “It’ll be fine.”


They had another day of competition — the free dance — to think about.


“It feels really good,” Chock said of returning to the Winter Games, where they competed in 2014. “It feels great to be on Olympic ice.”


The 2018 Winter Olympics are airing live on NBC. To learn more, visit teamusa.org.


Source: U.S. Skater Couple Competed Through a ‘Kind of Traumatic’ Moment Just Before Taking the Ice

Francia Raisa Says She ‘Couldn’t Move for 2 Months’ After Giving Selena Gomez Her Kidney

Francia Raisa Says She ‘Couldn’t Move for 2 Months’ After Giving Selena Gomez Her Kidney

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Francia Raisa went through a tough recovery process after she donated a kidney to Selena Gomez.


“It’s harder as the donor because we are losing something our body didn’t need to lose,” Raisa, 29, said during an upcoming appearance on Harry Connick Jr.’s daytime talk show Harry, according to Just Jared.


The Grown-ish actress added that watching her friend get “up and at it immediately” while she still had to go through months of recovery first was difficult.


I’m a very, very active person,” she said, explaining that it was hard when “my doctor said I couldn’t move for two months.”


“I couldn’t do anything active. All I could do was walk. That was very hard for me, and I have a dog,” she continued. “Every day the thing I look forward to is drinking my coffee, and walking, and I couldn’t do that. It was really, really hard.”



RELATED: Selena Gomez’s BFF Francia Raisa Reveals Why She Decided to Give Her a Kidney


Gomez shocked fans in September of last year when she announced that, due to lupus complications, she’d received a kidney transplant from her best friend Raisa over the summer.


Explaining why she made the decision to give her friend a kidney, Raisa told Today’s Savannah Guthrie, “One day she came home and she was emotional. I hadn’t asked anything. I knew she hadn’t been feeling well.”


“She couldn’t open a water bottle one day. She chucked it and she started crying. And I said, ‘What’s wrong?’ and that’s when she told me. And she goes, ‘I don’t know what to do. The list is seven to ten years long.’ ” she continued.


“It just vomited out of me: I was like, ‘Of course I’ll get tested,’ ” she added.



Raisa’s mother, Virginia Almendarez, spoke to Telemundo’s Al Rojo Vivo following the news, revealing that the pair had “been friends for many years.”


“They’re like sisters. I love her a lot, too. She loves me a lot. She says I’m her mom,” she continued, before adding that following the surgery, the longtime friends became closer than ever.


“The love between them has really grown. Selena is a great girl, and she also has a big heart, as does Francia. I’m very proud of both of them,” Almendarez said. “Francia has a huge heart because not anyone would just let go of one of their organs to give it to someone else.”


And after her recovery period was finally over in late September, Raisa shared a video of herself on Instagram lifting weights as she told fans how “happy” she was to be able to return to her active lifestyle.



“Happy to be back,” she captioned the video, during which her scar from the surgery that saved her friend’s life was visibly present.


Raisa’s full interview on Harry airs on Monday.


Source: Francia Raisa Says She ‘Couldn’t Move for 2 Months’ After Giving Selena Gomez Her Kidney

The One Thing You Can Do to Feel More Confident About Your Body, According to Plus-Size Model Tabria Majors

The One Thing You Can Do to Feel More Confident About Your Body, According to Plus-Size Model Tabria Majors

You might remember Tabria Majors from her viral Instagram photos recreating Victoria’s Secret ads, which proved that plus-size models can sell (and look amazing in) lingerie, too. And while the body-positive influencer said she doubts she’ll be a Victoria’s Secret angel anytime soon, she’s now one of six #SISwimSearch finalists—vote for her here—hoping to earn a spot in the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2019 rookie class.


RELATED: The 15 Best Body Positive Moments of 2017


Majors’ bold attitude and commitment to self-love makes her an inspiration for other women hoping to feel more confident in their skin. So when we had the chance to catch up with her in an Instagram Story interview, we jumped at the opportunity. Here, she opens up to Health about her favorite fitness moves, how she handles haters, and why it’s so important to make body peace and start loving the way you look.


How does it feel to be included in SI Swim?


“It feels amazing to be in SI this year. I still can’t believe that I’m here. It’s been a long time coming and I’m so excited that everyone finally gets to see the issue.”


What do you love most about your body?


“What I love most about my body is that I’m really strong. If I had to choose a favorite part, it would probably be my legs. I think they really represent my strength and also my femininity as a woman.”


How do you work out your legs?


“As far as working out, burpees are my favorite. They’re really hard, but they’re a great total body workout.”




What are your go-to moves for working your core?


“To work my core, I really enjoy playing racquetball, but if you want to do just a movement, I love the leg-ups where you’re holding the bar and you’re bringing your legs up because it’s incredibly difficult.”


Why is it important to you to be sex-positive?


“I embrace my sexuality a lot as a woman. I think everybody should be able to express that freely. We shouldn’t hold back, we are humans, we are sexual beings, and that’s that.”


RELATED: Yes, There Are 11 Different Types of Orgasms. Here’s How to Have Each


What would you tell young women who don’t know how to communicate what they want when it comes to sex?


“Communication is key in any relationship and it will probably be one of the most difficult discussions you ever have with someone, but just communicate with them freely beforehand: your likes, your dislikes, what you’re comfortable with, not comfortable with. It’s important that you left them know what you’re comfortable with and not comfortable with so you can be on the same page moving forward.” 




 


What do you do to practice self care?


“For self care, I really enjoy meditating every morning and every night. I begin my day like that, I end my day like that. I think it just provides a nice space of mental clarity.”


How did you get into meditation? 


“For me meditation has been very difficult over the past year, but I just started out doing five seconds every morning and every night, and I just work my way up gradually. I’m at one minute now.”


RELATED: How to Add Self Care to Your Workout Routine


How do you deal with criticism?


“I used to feed into the negative comments I received, but I find it’s best to just ignore it. These people don’t know me, they’re just judging me from a photo, and they’re projecting their insecurities onto me.”


What advice do you have for anyone struggling with body image?


“If you’re struggling with your body image, I just encourage you to find one thing that you like about yourself and just focus on that. If there’s something you want to change, feel free to change it—change is good! And if you want to remain the same, that’s good too.”


Source: The One Thing You Can Do to Feel More Confident About Your Body, According to Plus-Size Model Tabria Majors

February 16, 20180 commentsRead More